{stanford} rodin @ the cantor

December 12, 2017

Located right next door to the Anderson Collection at Stanford is Stanford’s Cantor Arts Center. This dramatic building is curated more like a traditional museum. While the Cantor is quite large, I really hadn’t planned on staying in this museum that long because my entire plan was just to see the Rodin exhibit. I just love Rodin and remember going to the Rodin museum in Philadelphia as well as in Paris. This exhibit at the Cantor was just stuffed with Rodin creations as well as other pieces that contrasted it or were of a similar nature.

Oddly enough, even though I’ve been to so many Rodin exhibits and museums, this was the first time that I actually saw his most famous Thinker! That’s because the one in Paris was being fixed up and therefore covered when I was there! Being such a big Rodin fan, I was glad I finally got to see his most famous piece!

A Rodin photo adventure:

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{oklahoma} cruisin’ the 66

November 22, 2017

Hello!

During my cross-country road trip a couple months ago, I mostly took the fast new highways to get from Point A to B as quickly as possible. However, for a stretch of about 60 miles in Oklahoma, we took things a little slower and drove East along the famous and historic Route 66. There are a whole slew of things sites to stop and see along the way – all of which were giant structures or statues. Take a look!

My mom standing in front of a giant soda bottle aka “pop bottle” as those local to Arcadia, OK might call it!

Just a bit further down the road, also in Arcadia, OK, is this giant round barn!

A giant 76-foot tall “oil man” can be found in Tulsa, OK, a city once known as The Oil Capital of the World!

A giant blue whale, found in Catoosa, OK, was originally built in the 1970s by a man named Hugh Davis as a present to his whale-figurine-loving wife!

Although I wish we could have driven further along Route 66, I’m grateful I got to at least make these fun stops – the random sites are one of the best parts of a roadtrip!

Until next month,

Attrace

After a short few days in Guatemala, we made it back to Belize. The boat ride back to Belize was insane. I have never been on a boat that was just so ill-equipped to deal with the conditions of the oceans like from Livingston to Punta Gorda. Essentially you’re passing open water and on a tiny little motor boat. The thing went up and down so far and the seats were very hard plastic … very uncomfortable and scary at times!

Anyway, once we arrived in Punta Gorda, we had to pass through immigration (again) and then entered the very (very, very) low key town of Punta Gorda. Home to a mix of Maya and Garifuna people (but known for being the hub of the Maya Toledo District, Deep South), the culture here is quite interesting. I’m not sure I would want to stay longer than the day we did though because there just wasn’t that much to see unless we had our own transportation and ability to get to some of the smaller Maya villages. Ah well, it was relaxing nonetheless.

Read about our other Belizean (and Guatemalan) adventures: belize city firstsbermudian landing baboonsbermudian landing eatscaye caulker splitcaye caulker waters • caye caulker snorkelcaye caulker lobstercaye caulker non-lobster eatscaye caulker sunset • san pedro sightssan pedro eatssan ignacio atm cavingsan ignacio poolssan ignacio cahal pechsan ignacio rio frio cavingsan ignacio caracol ruinssan ignacio eatsflores for a daytikal, take 2rio dulce afternoonsrio dulce fowlroad to livingstonlivingston garifuna lifelivingston’s 7 altars

A Punta Gorda, Belize photo adventure:

{guatemala} tikal, take 2

October 23, 2017

The whole reason for going to Guatemala this (second) time was to visit Tikal (for me, again). I have to say, even though it was my second time here, I was still mesmerized by the amazing temples, pyramids, and structures that the Maya people built. I especially love how Tikal is currently located in the middle of the jungle so you feel like perhaps this was how the Maya people lived too, though I can’t confirm that at all … it’s just what I imagine. I also like that we’re still able to climb up onto many of the structures unlike many places in the United States where you can only look at ancient ruins.

Read about our other Belizean (and Guatemalan) adventures: belize city firstsbermudian landing baboonsbermudian landing eatscaye caulker splitcaye caulker waters • caye caulker snorkelcaye caulker lobstercaye caulker non-lobster eatscaye caulker sunset • san pedro sightssan pedro eatssan ignacio atm cavingsan ignacio poolssan ignacio cahal pechsan ignacio rio frio cavingsan ignacio caracol ruinssan ignacio eatsflores for a day

A Tikal, Guatemala photo adventure:

One of the most important places people visit while jumping off from San Ignacio is the Caracol Maya ruins. Caracol is Belize’s largest and most important Maya site as it used to be one of the most important Maya epicenters. Potentially home to upwards of 150,000 people at its height, this site is known for its artificial reservoirs, extensive agricultural terraces, grand temples, and the fact that it’s now completely enshrouded by jungle. The most amazing thing is that Caana (Sky Place) in Plaza B used to be and still is Belize’s tallest building! I just loved wandering around the various trails that leads to all the ballcourts, plazas, temples, and the central acropolis. We had to go with a guide since it’s quite difficult to get to Caracol by yourself so it was neat to get a chance to listen to the history of this beautiful place as well. I would definitely recommend it!

Read about our other Belizean adventures: belize city firstsbermudian landing baboonsbermudian landing eatscaye caulker splitcaye caulker waters • caye caulker snorkelcaye caulker lobstercaye caulker non-lobster eatscaye caulker sunset • san pedro sightssan pedro eatssan ignacio atm cavingsan ignacio poolssan ignacio cahal pechsan ignacio rio frio caving

A San Ignacio, Belize photo adventure: