Ever since reading The Handmaid’s Tale, I”d been thinking about reading more Margaret Atwood books, but hadn’t been actively searching. Recently, I happened upon Oryx and Crake by Margaret Atwood and realized that it was the same author so of course I had to read it. Margaret Atwood must really love writing about dystopian societies because this one was a very dystopian society to the point where the main character Jimmy (who also goes by Snowman) didn’t even though if there were other real people left on the planet.

In the book, you are pulled back and forth from the present when Jimmy has named himself Snowman to the past during which Jimmy is growing up with his parents, going to college, and operating in a world he thinks is normal. To us today, the world seems horrible though not entirely impossible. Corporations have taken over everything. There are all kinds of genetically created food processes. There are crazy cross-breeds of animals that scientists created to get rid of one problem but as a result created a new problem. They then try and solve that problem by cross-breeding other animals. As you can imagine, the result is chaos. For a good chunk of the book, you don’t even know who Oryx and Crake are or if they’re people or characters at all. Eventually you do though and the story line becomes even creepier. Yikes! Dystopian societies where animals and humans are modified to be specific way are scary to think about!

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Read more about our United Kingdom adventure here:
Scotland – edinburgh, the old cityall things national museum • holyrood views 15th century st. giles cathedral closes abound edinburgh’s castle headed north dunkeld, the first stop the highlands killiecrankie’s soldier’s leap a wee dram of tomatin here comes the snow clava cairns’ standing stones crossing the bridge to skye isle of skye sites the old man of storreilean donan castle the heeland coo kilt rock “city” of portree black and white glen coe the last loch celebrating william wallace it’s the food!
Wales – cardiff’s majestic castle countryside it’s the food!fantasy costell cochcaerphilly castle + dragons dusk cardiff buildings the national museum collection mermaids in cardifffireworks
England – bath’s abbey bath’s baths bath’s royal crescent bath’s eats

This customer on horse in Suffolk, England was refused service at a McDonald’s Drive-Thru. The UK McDonald’s website devotes a full page on the reasons for not serving horseback riders in Drive-Thru.

Although, recently, a woman in Cleethorpes, UK was able to order a bag of carrots as treat for her pony, Savvanah, at a McDonald’s.

Wendy gladly served an order of Frosty for this horse Buns.

Others also seem less concerned about horses or horse drawn vehicles. I guess the Royal Society does not rule everywhere.

Dunkin Donuts                            Jack in the Box

Starbucks does not discriminate whether it’s a big or miniature horse.

Well … I wonder what the Royal Society has to say about this?

Read more about our United Kingdom adventure here:
Scotland – edinburgh, the old cityall things national museum • holyrood views 15th century st. giles cathedral closes abound edinburgh’s castle headed north dunkeld, the first stop the highlands killiecrankie’s soldier’s leap a wee dram of tomatin here comes the snow clava cairns’ standing stones crossing the bridge to skye isle of skye sites the old man of storreilean donan castle the heeland coo kilt rock “city” of portree black and white glen coe the last loch celebrating william wallace it’s the food!
Wales – cardiff’s majestic castle countryside it’s the food!fantasy costell cochcaerphilly castle + dragons dusk cardiff buildings the national museum collection mermaids in cardiff

When I saw this book as an option on my kindle, I knew I wanted to read it. It sounded so familiar, too. As realized as I started reading that I had actually read this book before (many years ago), and that’s why the title and general plot seemed so familiar.

I like how this book is written from the viewpoint of various characters from the book. It gives voice to each one without an omniscient third person point of view, which is actually quite refreshing. Since there aren’t too many characters, the switching back and forth doesn’t become too confusing.

Ultimately, this story is a struggle story, but also one that’s very sad. Imagine being a daughter that your parents only chose to have, and specifically designed (genetically) in order to save the life of your older sister. Now isn’t that a little messed up? Wouldn’t that put anyone (once they found out and understood that reality) over the edge a bit? I would think so. Well, that’s the story of the younger sister in this book. And it’s quite the tantalizing tale, with a plot twist at the end that’s all too fitting, but never expected. I won’t say any more than that though!